Guarded enthusiasm

Published: November 30, 2012

Ken Eller reviews the Scots Guards Standard Settings of Pipe Music, Volume III ¨C or “cots Guards 3″ ¨C one of the largest print collection of pipe music to be published in 30 years. He takes pipes|drums subscribers through the book’s highlights, and ponders some important questions of copyright and acknowledgment, as well as matters of style and taste. At $75 a pop, this potential Christmas gift is a guarded decision for pipers..

This content is for subscribers only. Please login to view this content. (Register.)
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 4.5/5
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1
THIS DAY IN HISTORY:
August 29, 1965Donald MacLean of Lewis dies suddenly at Cowal Games, age 63.
MOST RECENT POST
  • Keeping score
    Mon, 25 Aug 2014
    Scoresheets or crit-sheets have never been a regular thing at UK solo piping competitions. I remember arriving at Montrose Games in 1983, an awestruck 19-year-old from St. Louis playing at the “senior” solo competition on a brilli …
Read more »
UPCOMING EVENTS August 30, 2014Pacific Northwest Highland GamesExpo Center, Enumclaw, WA

August 30, 2014Calgary Highland GamesSpringbank Park, Calgary, AB

August 30, 2014Stranraer Highland GamesStranraer

August 31, 2014Canmore Highland GamesCanmore, AB

August 31, 2014Chatsworth Country FairChatsworth House, Chatsworth, Bakewell, Derbyshire

TIP OF THE DAY
Pipers should avoid memorizing their music until the tune can be played from start to finish, fluidly, without error and at full speed. Once you memorize your music, it will become your reference every time you play. If your memory of the music has flaws in it, through repetition, you will permanently cement these flaws in your playing. Memorization is similar to the wood stain that would be added when building a bookcase – it would be the final touch to a finished product.
John Cairns, London, Ontario