Tongue twisters

Published: March 31, 2009
(Page 3 of 4)

Monsieur Style Guy,

I’ve heard different views on what to do when approaching a judge, specifically there has been some discussion on whether or not you should shake the judge’s hand. Is it presumptuous, or extra credit?  

Any additional comments on the general subject would be appreciated as well.

Thanks a ton,

The Awkward Piper

An excellent question, Awkward Piper. Tell me, though: are you female and, if so, are you hot? If the answer is yes to both, then dispense with the handshake and get straight to a more – how shall I say – intimate approach.

 

But no tongues.

 

Jesting aside, the answer is generally no. Do not shake a piping or drumming judge’s hand. It communicates a too-close-for-comfort relationship, and more often than not will make the judge squirm just a little. Simple verbal pleasantries work just fine.

 

There are a few exceptions, however: if you happen to be good friends with the adjudicator and haven’t seen him/her in a long time, then go ahead and shake hands. It would feel weird not to. The other scenario would be if you are pipe-major and you get to the starting line. It is generally customary for the ensemble judge to extend a handshake of good luck to all bands.

 

And then offering the judge a pocket-sized bottle of Purell is always appreciated, too . . .

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