Glasgow Skye will bolster Grade 2 at Costa Mesa

Published: May 15, 2014
(Page 1 of 1)

The recent news about bands in Grade 2 continues, with the Costa Mesa Highland Games in California flying in Scotland’s Glasgow Skye Association Pipe Band, the first time that a guest Grade 2 band has come to the competition, this year on May 23-24.

Costa Mesa typically would have a guest Grade 1 band, with the likes of Simon Fraser University, Dowco Triumph Street and LA Scots competing and performing in the past at the event, just south of Los Angeles.

Glasgow Skye enjoyed a successful year in Grade 2 on the RSPBA circuit in 2013, finishing third in the Champion of Champions table, playing with one of the largest pipe sections in the grade.

“We consider it a great honour to be invited out to Costa Mesa,” said Glasgow Skye Pipe-Major Kenny MacLeod. “The band is very excited about it, and it will be a great experience. I haven’t played at that games for a few years, and it’s nice to know we won’t need our capes for our first run out of the year.”

MacLeod said his band leaves Glasgow May 20th, and returns to Scotland May 28th, staying in Redondo Beach, California, during its stay.

The previously struggling Prince Charles Pipe Band of San Francisco has rebounded and will compete against Glasgow Skye in the grade.

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TIP OF THE DAY
To ease the blowing-in period of a chanter reed, simply press the reed firmly in the lowest part of the blades between the finger and thumb until you feel both blades ease gently together. Continue to do this and keep blowing the reed until you find the reed giving an acceptible weight.
Tom McAllister, Jr.