Jeannie Campbell receives MBE for Services to Piping

Published: June 13, 2014
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Jeannie Campbell [photo: Ned Lecic]

Jean Campbell of Glasgow was made a Member of the British Empire for services to piping on this year’s annual Queen’s Birthday Honours List announced on June 13, 2014.

Campbell’s contributions to the art include several books and numerous articles on piping, as well as regular reporting on piping competitions. For many years she worked with the late Seumas MacNeill, and has dedicated much of her time to studying bagpipe makers.

Her book, Highland Bagpipe Makers, is considered the best source so far on manufacturers known to have produced the great pipe.

Pipers and drummers are infrequently recognized in the Queen’s Honours for their work, but recipients have included Roddy MacLeod (MBE), Captain John A. MacLellan (MBE), Gavin Stoddart (BEM), Jim Kilpatrick (MBE), Iain MacLellan (BEM), Richard Parkes (MBE) and Donald MacLeod (MBE).

Despite his substantial and often pioneering work for piping, Seumas MacNeill never received a “gong” from Buckingham Palace.

pipes|drums congratulates Jeannie Campbell on her official recognition for many years of contributions to piping.

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TIP OF THE DAY
Pipers: Blow your drones without the pipe chanter for a few minutes when you first take your pipes out of the box. Initially, the blades on your pipe chanter reed and the tongues on your drone reeds will be dry (not pliable), which will make the chanter reed stiff and often too much for the drone reeds – causing them to shut off. The warm air that is blown through the drone reeds will make the tongues more pliable and receptive to handling the strength of the pipe chanter. This applies to synthetic and cane drone reeds.
John Cairns, double Gold Medallist