“The Big Spree” – the first installment in the 2014 Set Tunes Series

Published: July 11, 2014
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MacCrimmon_piper_thumbWe begin the 2014 Set Tunes Series by William Donaldson with “The Big Spree,” one of the greatest and most-played tunes in the piobaireachd repertory.

Simply click on the first page below to go to the full tune and MP3 audio file, and the complete archive of the more than 140 piobaireachds in the series.

Click to open the full tune and the complete Set Tunes Series.

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  1. jimmcg@piping.on.ca

    Great to hear the ground and early variations sung with some real zip and with a bit more character than we usually hear; though I often wonder if natural inflections in the voice allow us to sing these tunes more quickly than we can play them. Using the voice to slide between notes allows us to sing with more flow and forward motion than the more staccato note changes on the pipe would support. JM

    1. amcm1@bellsouth.net

      Well said, Jim. I guess we will always wonder about “original” tempos. Although I rather enjoy the “zip” I agree with the concern about the transition from voice to fingers. It could be a bit dicey even for our better players….
      Al McMullin.

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    Having a tune named after you is a wonderful gesture. I can’t think of a more thoughtful and kind gift than a piece of music inspired by life and friendship. I’ve been thinking about this custom for a few weeks … Continue reading …
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UPCOMING EVENTS May 30, 2015British ChampionshipsMeadow Park, Bathgate

June 6, 2015Bellingham Highland GamesHovander Homestead Park, Ferndale, WA

June 6, 2015MILWAUKEE HIGHLAND GAMES7300 Chestnut Street Wauwatosa, WI

June 6, 2015Cookstown Highland GamesTBA

June 6, 2015Stockbridge Pipe Band 20th Anniversary ConcertEdinburgh

TIP OF THE DAY
Pipers: When loosening a tight joint ensure both hands are as close together as possible. This will reduce the possibility of snapping the timber.
Stuart Shedden, Glasgow, 1998 Northern Meeting Gold Medallist

FROM THE ARCHIVES