The SFU leadership change: a video interview with P-M Alan Bevan and Terry Lee

Published: October 5, 2013
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The more than 30-year tenure of Terry Lee as Pipe-Major of the Grade 1 Simon Fraser University Pipe Band is one of the longest in the history of top-tier pipe bands, and when he handed the reins on September 28, 2013, to long-time SFU member Alan Bevan it was a historic moment.

Under Lee’s direction, SFU has been World Champions six times, runner-up nine times and finished in the top-three more in more than half of their appearances at the contest since 1983.

In this exclusive video interview, pipes|drums hears directly from Alan Bevan and Terry Lee about the future for the band, some of the reasons for making the move now, and the importance of planning for the future in the modern pipe band.

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  1. kiegelmann

    This is awesome. I am willing to bet a lot of people were thinking “something must have happened” or something along those lines. Excited to see where the band goes from here.

  2. SeanSomers

    And that’s the way to do it! Congrats Terry on your many accomplishments over the years, and good luck to Alan! Sean Somers

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TIP OF THE DAY
When tuning chanters one-to-one, make sure that the players play tunes with each other. This will allow the players to blow more naturally than playing scales.
Richard Parkes, P-M Field Marshal Montgomery