1920’s era Ebony wood Silver and Ivory Robertson bagpipes $3200 USD

1920’s Vintage ebony wood silver and ivory.Ivory mounts and ring caps.  Silver slides and ferrels added back in 2007 by Bagpipe Silver Company out of Houston, Texas.

Mouth piece bulb made from an old ivory cue ball about 5 years ago by Mark Cushing out of New York.

Blow pipe is original and has been bored to a larger opening and brass lined.

Asking $3200 US for sticks and stocks.

See attached photo and more are available upon request.

These pipes have a beautiful bold sound.

Played in Pro solos and grade 1 band.  Great remarks.

 

Thanks,

Chris Lorince

Contact me at clorince78th@gmail.com with any questions.

More pictures available upon request.

Price: $3200 USD

Price: $3200 USD Contact: Chris Lorince | Email User
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