A student’s guide to piping and university/college – Part 1

Published: May 31, 2012

Just in time for the end of the school year and the beginning of many pipers’ first years at university and college, professional-class solo piper Elizabeth Sheridan of Oakville, Ontario, provides insights and tips on how to get the most from your post-secondary school experience while keeping your keen interest in the pipes. Practicing, money, time management, scholarships, housing ¨C it’s all here, along with insights (in Part 2) from student-pipers in the UK. A member of the Grade 1 Peel Regional Police Pipe Band and a student at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, Liz Sheridan is living proof that it is possible to let both academic and piping lives coexist . . . and even thrive.

 This content is for 1 Year Subscription and 2 Year Subscription members only. Please Subscribe or Login to read the article.
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5
VN:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0
GET THE MOBILE APP!
The new pipes|drums app offers the same publication with a streamlined experience. Get the latest news optimized for your smartphone.
Download on the App Store

Get it on Google Play
THIS DAY IN HISTORY:
August 19, 1745Bonnie Prince Charlie raises the standard at Glenfinnan.
MOST RECENT POST
  • Maxville memoir
    Mon, 7 Aug 2017
    Aways good to get back to Maxville for the Glengarry Highland Games, despite the usual scramble to get out of town before the holiday weekend traffic hits Toronto. Here are a few stand-out memories taken away from my two days. … C …
Read more »
UPCOMING EVENTS August 23, 2017Argyllshire GatheringVarious venues, Oban, Scotland

August 25, 2017Cowal Highland GatheringBlack Park, Dunoon, Scotland

August 26, 2017Glenurquhart Highland GamesBlairbeg, Drumnadrochit, Scotland

August 26, 2017Strathardle Highland GatheringBannerfield, Kirkmichael, Scotland

August 26, 2017Birnam Highland GamesDunkeld, Scotland

TIP OF THE DAY
Tenor drummers: When composing rhythmical passages in a tenor drum score, don’t just think about replicating the accented phrases within the snare score, but give equal consideration towhat is happening in the melody. Question your composition. For example, if a triplet occurs in the snare score,check if that triplet exists in the melody. If not,ask yourself if there is any value to that triplet being incorporated into the tenor score. That’s just a short example, but applying that principle is a small step towards improving ensemble.
Scott Currie, SC Drumming, Uddingston, Scotland

FROM THE ARCHIVES