Guarded enthusiasm

Published: November 30, 2012

Ken Eller reviews the Scots Guards Standard Settings of Pipe Music, Volume III ¨C or “cots Guards 3” ¨C one of the largest print collection of pipe music to be published in 30 years. He takes pipes|drums subscribers through the book’s highlights, and ponders some important questions of copyright and acknowledgment, as well as matters of style and taste. At $75 a pop, this potential Christmas gift is a guarded decision for pipers..

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Pipers: Blow your drones without the pipe chanter for a few minutes when you first take your pipes out of the box. Initially, the blades on your pipe chanter reed and the tongues on your drone reeds will be dry (not pliable), which will make the chanter reed stiff and often too much for the drone reeds – causing them to shut off. The warm air that is blown through the drone reeds will make the tongues more pliable and receptive to handling the strength of the pipe chanter. This applies to synthetic and cane drone reeds.
John Cairns, double Gold Medallist