Michael Grey: the pipes|drums Interview – Part 3

Published: July 31, 2012

In this third part of Michael Grey: the pipes|drums Interview, we delve directly into the composition side of his career: how he approaches composing, the need to have a professional attitude about copyright and royalties, and his take on the great composers like Donald MacLeod, G.S. McLennan, John McLellan and Gordon Duncan. Grey discusses the notion of the “accepted competition repertoire,” and the need to expand attitudes to be more inclusive, while also citing what he feels are the greatest tunes ever penned. Exclusively for subscribers to pipes|drums.

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TIP OF THE DAY
Tenor drummers: When composing rhythmical passages in a tenor drum score, don’t just think about replicating the accented phrases within the snare score, but give equal consideration towhat is happening in the melody. Question your composition. For example, if a triplet occurs in the snare score,check if that triplet exists in the melody. If not,ask yourself if there is any value to that triplet being incorporated into the tenor score. That’s just a short example, but applying that principle is a small step towards improving ensemble.
Scott Currie, SC Drumming, Uddingston, Scotland