Roddy MacLeod: the pipes|drums Interview – Part 2

Published: April 7, 2013

We continue our exclusive discussion with Roddy MacLeod, one of the world’s great builders of piping. In Part 1, MacLeod remembered his earliest years as a young piper in Cumbernauld, Scotland. In Part 2, MacLeod looks back on his formative piping years with his teacher, the legendary Duncan Johnstone. He goes into his early pipe band days with the Grade 1 Red Hackle in Glasgow under Pipe-Major Malcolm MacKenzie, leading to his long tenure with British Caledonian Airways / Power of Scotland / ScottishPower and the Spirit of Scotland, and the importance of strong soloists in the mix. He then touches on why he is not a judge with the Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association.

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TIP OF THE DAY
Tenor drummers: When composing rhythmical passages in a tenor drum score, don’t just think about replicating the accented phrases within the snare score, but give equal consideration towhat is happening in the melody. Question your composition. For example, if a triplet occurs in the snare score,check if that triplet exists in the melody. If not,ask yourself if there is any value to that triplet being incorporated into the tenor score. That’s just a short example, but applying that principle is a small step towards improving ensemble.
Scott Currie, SC Drumming, Uddingston, Scotland