Teaching Teachers, by Bob Worrall – Part 1: the three learning styles in all of us

Published: January 15, 2014

In the first-ever series of articles especially about teaching and for teachers of piping and drumming, world-renowned piper, adjudicator, composer and teacher Bob Worrall examines the three basic styles of learning, and how they relate to successful instruction. By recognizing and identifying first the dominant learning styles of pupils, teachers can provide better and more effective tuition, and teachers who can match their own dominant learning styles with those of their students are more likely to see better engagement and progress throughout the process. The first part in the new series exclusively for subscribers to pipes|drums.

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THIS DAY IN HISTORY:
December 3, 1977Paul McCartney’s “Mull of Kintyre,” featuring the Campbeltown Pipe Band, reaches #1 in the UK.
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TIP OF THE DAY
Pipers should avoid memorizing their music until the tune can be played from start to finish, fluidly, without error and at full speed. Once you memorize your music, it will become your reference every time you play. If your memory of the music has flaws in it, through repetition, you will permanently cement these flaws in your playing. Memorization is similar to the wood stain that would be added when building a bookcase – it would be the final touch to a finished product.
John Cairns, London, Ontario

FROM THE ARCHIVES