Jim Hutton: the pipes|drums Interview from the Archives – Part 3

Published: October 31, 2011

In this penultimate installment of our February 2000interview with the late Jim Hutton, we get into contentious topics of the time ¨C namely, conflict of interest in the pipe band judging ranks, the emerging game of numbers in the upper-grade bands and the varying standards around the world of pipe band snare drumming. Interestingly, Hutton touches upon the trend that had then only recently re-started with flourishing tenors, and his thoughts at the time foreshadowed the controversy of opinions that would follow over the next decade.

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THIS DAY IN HISTORY:
May 1, 1978First issue of Capt John MacLellan’s “International Piper” magazine published.
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UPCOMING EVENTS May 7, 2016KNOCKOUT FINAL – SCOTTISH PIPERS’ ASSOCIATIONGlasgow Scotland - College of Piping Otago St.

May 7, 2016Scotia-Glenville OutdoorCeltic Hall 430 New Karner Road Colonie NY

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TIP OF THE DAY
Pipers should avoid memorizing their music until the tune can be played from start to finish, fluidly, without error and at full speed. Once you memorize your music, it will become your reference every time you play. If your memory of the music has flaws in it, through repetition, you will permanently cement these flaws in your playing. Memorization is similar to the wood stain that would be added when building a bookcase – it would be the final touch to a finished product.
John Cairns, London, Ontario

FROM THE ARCHIVES