John MacColl’s mysterious inspiration – a doozy of a dilemma

Published: February 28, 2013

Jim McGillivray’s excellent analysis of the famous John MacColl 2/4 march, “Sir Arthur Bignold of Loch Rosque,” brings to light the question of whether the tune is actually his own, or if, as in so many instances in pipe music, his inspiration came from other sources.

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TIP OF THE DAY
Pipers should avoid memorizing their music until the tune can be played from start to finish, fluidly, without error and at full speed. Once you memorize your music, it will become your reference every time you play. If your memory of the music has flaws in it, through repetition, you will permanently cement these flaws in your playing. Memorization is similar to the wood stain that would be added when building a bookcase – it would be the final touch to a finished product.
John Cairns, London, Ontario