Updated: Warren resigns from Lomond & Clyde

Published: September 30, 2008
(Page 1 of 1)

The Grade 2 Lomond & Clyde Pipe Band of Clydebank, Scotland, which took prizes in the grade this year at two RSPBA championships, is searching for a pipe-major after Paul Warren resigned. Warren had been Pipe-Major of the band for nine years.

It was reported that Lead-Drummer Les Galbraith has left the ban, and his successor is not yet known.

Under Paul Warren’s guidance since the band was formed in 2000, the group has gone from Grade 4B to its current Grade 2, and was one of the most meteoric rises in pipe band history, climbing five grades in five seasons.

Band Chairman Fraser Sergeant described Warren’s service as “unstinting,” and went on to say, “The Chairman, Committee and past and present players would all like to thank Paul for the job he has done for the band, and wish him every success in the future.”

It is not known what Warren’s future plans hold, but he will continue as Director of the National Youth Pipe Band of Scotland, a project started by the National Piping Centre in Glasgow where he works full-time.

Lomond & Clyde was sixth at the Scottish Championships and third at Cowal, in 2008, and the pipe section managed a first overall at the European Championships in Grade 2.

Those interested in the pipe-majorship are invited to contact the band’s secretary  at alanlochore@yahoo.co.uk.

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Pipers: For those playing cane reeds, if they stop try blowing down the drone a couple of times rather than springing the tongue. This will give the blade a natural gentle lift.
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