From Winnipeg, a patented new twist on chanter-tuning

Published: July 30, 2014
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The inner-workings of the patented Campbell tuning mechanism.

When tuning a pipe section, many a good reed has been ruined after hearing the dreaded nick of a delicate corner of cane against the chanter stock, but Kyle Campbell of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, has seemingly solved that and all the other adjustment hassles with a patented new mechanism.

It allows for reed adjustments without having to remove the instrument or touch the reed. A series of gears and an external knob allow the reed to be moved slightly sharper or flatter, saving time, aggravation and risk. Campbell said the integrated mechanism is corrosion-proof.

The Campbell tuning mechanism integrated into a finished McCallum Mark 3 chanter.

After 10 years of research and development, Campbell will finally officially launch his chanter in Glasgow at Piping Live! on August 12th with Willie McCallum and Craig Muirhead demonstrating, each representing McCallum Bagpipes, which has licensed the mechanism for a new “Campbell” model, integrated with a McCallum Mark 3 plastic chanter.

Campbell worked with McCallum Bagpipes to design the logo, website and literature for the product, modified to fit the components.

“It sounds fantastic and works flawlessly,” Campbell said. “The chanter is based on . . .

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