Gillies Collection officially opens at Piping Live!

Published: July 31, 2014
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New printed collections of pipe music are becoming less and less frequent, and one that represents the compositions of three generations of one piping family is unique. The Gillies Collection, a new compilation featuring the tunes Norman, Alasdair and Norrie Gillies, will be unveiled at Piping Live! at 11 am, August 14th, with performances by former members of the Queens Own Highlanders, the great solo piper Gordon Walker, Darach Urquhart and the Ullapool & District Pipe Band.

The Gillies Collection features compositions and arrangements from my family and includes a varied range of tunes,” said Norrie Gilles. “Most of these tunes are easy enough for the average piper and are all set out in an easy-to-read format. The book itself has been a plan in my family for years and was previously started by my father, Alasdair Gillies, before a computer malfunction set him back.”

Norrie Gillies said that his friend Gary Nimmo, a piping tutor . . .

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TIP OF THE DAY
To ease the blowing-in period of a chanter reed, simply press the reed firmly in the lowest part of the blades between the finger and thumb until you feel both blades ease gently together. Continue to do this and keep blowing the reed until you find the reed giving an acceptible weight.
Tom McAllister, Jr.

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